Play comes to humans naturally. It creates space for learning, testing, experimenting, and, most importantly, failing without real-world consequences. Games are tools of practice that allow players to gain new experiences, skills, and knowledge that can be leveraged in daily life. Unfortunately, this space that play creates is often perceived as unproductive and juvenile. Such an approach limits access to this space and gatekeeps who should be accepted and how play should be experienced. It positions games as the opposite of education when play can be education's biggest ally. As something so fundamental to human nature, play cannot be separated from how we experience our world, interpret, and learn from it. As displayed in this special section of VAR, there are many ways of connecting play, games, and playfulness with critical, intentional outcomes in pedagogical spaces. Play has many forms, which exist and are experienced in different dimensions. This...

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