The culture of criminal punishment is a point of departure that the multifaceted Chicago-based artist Marc Fischer has returned to repeatedly over his career. Marc began corresponding with incarcerated people while distributing his photocopied fanzines in high school. While attending Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh as an undergraduate, he curated an exhibition with the work of several artists incarcerated at the now-shuttered Western State Penitentiary. Through corresponding with incarcerated people, Marc met and developed a long-term collaboration with Angelo, a prolific artist incarcerated in California. Angelo's drawings and descriptions of incarcerated people's improvised implements were assembled into a 2003 book titled Prisoners’ Inventions by the artist collective Temporary Services, through which Marc collaborates alongside Brett Bloom and Salem Collo-Julin. A contemporaneous traveling exhibition by the same name included examples of the inventions Angelo sketched and described in the book. Since that time, Marc has occasionally collaborated with projects addressing incarceration,...

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