From 1903 to 1936, photographer Elfie Huntington co-owned and operated the Huntington & Bagley Studio with Joseph Bagley in Springville, Utah.1 During those thirty-three years, both the studio and Huntington were fixtures in the rural town. As was typical of photography shops in small communities, people and portraiture made up the primary focus of the more than fourteen thousand glass-plate negatives from the studio that have been preserved and archived.2 However, the shop was atypical in the ways in which it provided a distinct and at times surprising window into the fairly homogenous community of rural Utah County—questioning gender norms and dealing with taboos such as gambling, smoking, and drinking. The unusual background and life experiences of Elfie Caroline Huntington Bagley (1868–1949) provide a compelling framework in which to analyze the photographs she produced as a partner in the Huntington & Bagley Studio. Key aspects of her personal...

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