In 1949 the painter Mabel Frazer (1887–1981) applied for, and finally received, promotion to the position of associate professor of art at the University of Utah. Yet, after nearly three decades of diligent service, she witnessed her male peers, often with far fewer bona fides, receive advancement.1 This was the challenge, she acknowledged, of being a “woman in a man's institution.”2 Throughout her career Frazer repeatedly overcame similar challenges and, by so doing, defied and redefined what it meant to be a female artist in Utah. This essay explores one of the significant ways in which Frazer's work stretched gendered conventions. More specifically it focuses on her work in the rugged landscapes of southern Utah and northern Arizona. Working in the West during the 1920s and early 1930s, Frazer fought against the conventions of a woman's place in the arts and the idea that landscape painting was “man's...

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