In 1939, Salt Lake Tribune reporter Grace Grether described Alice Merrill Horne as the “The First Lady in Utah Art.” “Of hundreds who pause to admire her,” Grether wrote, “there may be some who would not recognize her face, but probably not one would fail to know her name and what it stands for in the development of Utah art and artists.”1 Horne's reputation was exceptional in mid-twentieth-century Utah. According to Grether, almost any of the newspaper's readers and any visitors to the upcoming exhibition at the ZCMI Tiffin Room would recognize not only Horne's name but her professional contributions to the arts. At this time Utah women were not known for their careers. Although many women in Utah worked, messages both secular and religious instructed them to stay at home and be mothers. When they did work, their efforts were often invisible. Few women matched the public prominence...

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