Many of an archive's activities are based on long-held policies or views regarding what is considered “archival” and who uses “archival” materials. Often, this means collecting old materials like letters, diaries, ledgers, and photographs related to local or regional topics and promoting their use among academic, avocational, or family historians; local community members; and—in the case of academic archives—students. There is not anything wrong with this approach; in fact, it is one crafted out of necessity. Archives only have limited resources to acquire, organize, describe, and provide access to their collections, so it is absolutely necessary to draw boundaries. But occasionally, a collecting opportunity presents itself that causes an institution to rethink what they collect, how they market their materials, and who their users are. For Utah State University (USU) Special Collections, this opportunity came in the form of the Outdoor Recreation Archive.

The Outdoor Recreation Archive is the name...

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