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Footnotes

1. Michele F. Margolis, From Politics to the Pews: How Partisanship and the Political Environment Shape Religious Identity (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018), 12-13.
2. Margolis, From Politics to the Pews, 88-92.
3. Michael Lipka and Gregory A. Smith, “Among Democrats, Christians Lean Toward Biden, While ‘Nones’ Prefer Sanders,” Pew Research Center, January 31, 2020, https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/01/31/among-democrats-christians-lean-toward-biden-while-nones-prefer-sanders/. There are some religious changes among Black millennials, who are less likely to say religion is very important in their lives or to pray daily than older Black Americans, though they are markedly more devout than White Americans of their age group. Jeff Diamant and Besheer Mohamed, “Black Millennials Are More Religious Than Other Millennials,” Pew Research Center, July 20, 2018, https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/07/20/black-millennials-are-more-religious-than-other-millennials/.
4. Frank Newport, “Religion Remains a Strong Marker of Political Identity in U.S.,” Gallup, July 28, 2014, https://news.gallup.com/poll/174134/religion-remains-strong-marker-political-identity.aspx.
5. Ryan Burge is quoted in Thomas B. Edsall, “In God We Divide: The Political Dimensions of Worship Have Never Been Greater,” New York Times, March 25, 2020, https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/25/opinion/religion-democrats-republicans.html.
6. This research by political scientist Brian Schaffner draws on the 2018 Cooperative Congressional Election Study and is quoted in Edsall, “In God We Divide.”
7. Robert D. Putnam and David E. Campbell, American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2010), 434.
8. Robert P. Jones, The End of White Christian America (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2016), 49.
9. Melinda Lundquist Denton and Richard Flory, Back-Pocket God: Religion and Spirituality in the Lives of Emerging Adults (New York: Oxford University Press, 2020), 48. See also 183-84.
10. Margolis notes the decline of split-ticket voting since the 1970s in From Politics to the Pews, 8-9.
11. Margolis, From Politics to the Pews, 191.
12. Margolis, From Politics to the Pews, 143.
13. Margolis, From Politics to the Pews, 195.
14. Jana Riess, The Next Mormons: How Millennials Are Changing the LDS Church (New York: Oxford University Press, 2019), 187.
15. Stephen Cranney, “Who Is Leaving the Church? Demographic Predictors of Ex-Latter-day Saint Status in the Pew Religious Landscape Survey,” BYU Studies 58, no. 1 (2019): 99-108.
16. Riess, The Next Mormons, 224-26.
17. Richard Lyman Bushman, Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2005).
18. Sean, telephone interview with Jana Riess, February 19, 2020.
19. For more on Ezra Taft Benson’s political legacy within the LDS Church, see Matthew L. Harris, Watchman on the Tower: Ezra Taft Benson and the Making of the Mormon Right (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 2020); and Jan Shipps, “Ezra Taft Benson and the Conservative Turn of ‘Those Amazing Mormons,‘” in Mormonism and American Politics, ed. Randall Balmer and Jana Riess (New York: Columbia University Press, 2016), 73-84.
20. Jana Riess, Religion News Service, “Commentary: 63% of Latter-day Saint Men Give Trump a Thumbs Up, But Only 42% of Women Do the Same,” Salt Lake Tribune, March 19, 2019, https://www.sltrib.com/religion/2019/03/19/commentary-latter-day/.
21. Jeffrey M. Jones, “Trump Third Year Sets New Standard for Party Polarization,” Gallup, January 21, 2020, https://news.gallup.com/poll/283910/trump-third-year-sets-new-standard-party-polarization.aspx.

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