In 1980 church leaders issued a policy on translation of Latter-day scriptures to other languages: translators should follow the words, phrases, and sentence structures, as well as the idiomatic expressions and literary style of the original authors as literally as possible, even if some expressions are awkward or ambiguous.1 The policy came in the wake of the church's endeavor to produce its own edition of the King James Bible, soon followed by the edition of the four Standard Works as one book.2 Cross-references, a Bible dictionary, and a topical index aimed at creating doctrinal cohesion and coordinated scripture study. To guarantee the same for other languages, close literalness in translation seemed the obvious path. In 1980 an example had just been set by the complete retranslation of the Book of Mormon in German. It was the work of Immo Luschin, then president of the Swiss Temple, who...

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