Scholars have only recently begun to examine constructions of impairment and disability in medieval literature and history, utilizing interdisciplinary approaches to deepen our understanding of attitudes toward visible and invisible difference in the Middle Ages. One of the most important contributions to this emerging field of study remains Irina Metzler's Disability in Medieval Europe.1 Metzler's study provided the theoretical foundation for later studies and inspired readings of a variety of medieval Latin and vernacular texts through the lens of Critical Disability Studies, an approach that “rejects the traditional bio-medical understanding of disability as an individual deficit” and instead sees disability “as a social phenomenon embedded in social arrangements and cultural conventions.”2 In the field of Old Norse-Icelandic literature and medieval Icelandic history, a number of works have appeared that discuss physical, sensory, and mental difference3 in medieval Iceland.4 The most recent research within this area...

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