Editors Rebecca Merkelbach and Gwendolyne Knight introduce the volume with a robust descriptive definition of the terms “Otherness” and alterity as employed in Old Norse Studies over a range of publications over the last fifteen years. They acknowledge that many of the volume's contributions engage with “Otherness” rather than alterity, but defend the volume's focus on alterity; drawing on postmodern and postcolonial theory, they argue that alterity disrupts the dichotomy between the “Self” and the “Other” and allows scholars to discuss difference without the hegemonic associations implied by “Otherness” (pp. 10–12).

The terminology employed in the volume's title and section headings is at times misleading. The term deviancy, for example, is not critically employed in any contribution. The contributions under “Paranormal Beings” all specifically explore transformations. “Rogue Sagas” contributions address issues of canonicity and critical attention within the Íslendingasögur. Contributions to “Marginality and Interconnectedness” all present valuable additions to...

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