Reynistaðarbók (AM 764 4to, ca. 1376–1386) contains a summary of Roman history likely based on a vernacular source common to Rómverja saga.1 A passage therein is of some importance for our understanding of Hugsvinnsmál, the Old Norse translation of Dicta or Disticha Catonis, yet it has received little scholarly attention until this point.2 Describing the aftermath of the defeat of Pompey the Great at Pharsalus and later that of his allies in Africa, the summary includes the comment that Cato the Younger was the author of the poem in question. It does not, however, give the Latin title but that of the Old Norse version, presupposing an equivalence between the original and the translation. The title Hugsvinnsmál draws on the name Cato, derived from catus (wise, clear-sighted), translating it into the Old Norse counterpart hugsvinnr and joining this supposed author's ‘speaking name’ with mál for...

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