Saintly authority over demonic forces, typologically linked to scripture, is an indispensable feature of early English hagiographies. Power struggles are especially prominent in interactions that Charles Abbetmeyer classifies as “Plaints of Lucifer,” in which a saint or apostle confronts one or more lesser demons who bemoan their “tortures and the utter hopelessness of hell.”3 The saint's victory over the devil and its minions reflects his or her spiritual perfection and psychological mastery of sin, even when the confrontation physically manifests with corporeal harm inflicted by saint and/or demon.4 This Antonian hagiographical trope has been analyzed in such narratives as Cynewulf's Juliana,5 various accounts of Guthlac of Crowland,6 and the Old English accounts of St. Margaret.7 Yet another largely ignored account of saintly domination of demons is found in the anonymous prose Old English Acts of Andrew (OE Acts).8

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