In his lengthy Pitchfork review of Moses Sumney's first album, Aromanticism (2017), Jason King does not attempt to contain his enthusiasm for the “art-soul singer-songwriter” (2017). In the first three paragraphs, King compares Sumney with the literary figures Langston Hughes, Bartleby, Nietzsche, and James Baldwin, on the one hand, and with Arthur Russell, Gilbert Gil, India.Arie, and Tina Turner (among other musicians) on the other (2017). Sumney's sound also warrants a rapturous, complicated treatment; King (2017) notes its “drifty, slo-mo songcraft and ambient production” and its “austere guitar arrangements and performances” while also noting its kinship with “Brazilian jazz . . . neo-jazz [and] neo-soul,” concluding that his “idiosyncratic sound borrows from the musical style of every decade since the 1970s, but doesn't seem beholden to any specific one.” Sumney's music remains rooted in accessible experimentation, and the singer's voice (his mid-range is very good, and his...

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