Seha is a Moroccan trickster, known elsewhere also as Joha, the renowned trickster in Jewish and non-Jewish Mediterranean folklore. Marc Eliany's modest volume introduces close to 50 Seha tales, annotated and framed in thematically organized chapters that range from social concepts such as compassion and gossip to phenomena such as immigration, secularization, and modernization. The author, Eliany, is the mediating agent, writing down these tales that he had heard from his beloved grandparents in his Moroccan hometown Benni Mellal and later in the post-immigration residence of his paternal grandparents in Kiryat Shmonah, Israel. Not only do these tales serve as a rich template for ethnographic and historical analysis of the Jews of Morocco, pre- and post-migration, they also intimately recollect one person's geographic and mental journey.

The 27 thematic chapters are followed by concluding remarks addressing the distinct repertoire of each of the three storytellers: Grandpa Mordekhay's Seha—a cultural Jewish...

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