Aiming to analyze the “gendered social codes for the performance of love,” Bronwyn Reddan applies a methodology in Love, Power, and Gender in Seventeenth-Century French Fairy Tales that is grounded in the notion that “emotions have a history that provides insight into the cultural and social dynamics of the society in which they are expressed” (p. 14). Drawing on the scholarship of Monique Scheer, Barbara Rosenwein, and Pierre Bourdieu, Reddan views the expression of emotions of love as a performative, active, and learned practice in which members of an emotional community use shared “emotion scripts” and thus challenge or revise social and cultural norms (pp. 14–8). Through extensive close readings of the emotion scripts in seventeenth-century fairy tales, particularly those penned by upper-class salon women, collectively known as the conteuses, Reddan clarifies how gender influenced the experience and expression of love in early modern France. In particular, Reddan convincingly...

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