This book opens with a discussion of disciplinary methodology from which one might easily surmise that this will be a study of the folklore of women and food written from the perspective of cultural anthropology. One might therefore anticipate analyses of folktales that feature women making food or hungering for it; the physical spaces where women prepared food, their tools and serving utensils, as well as the ideas circulating across the centuries about women's bodies and appetite; and images of women in kitchens or feeding the sick, as well as plays that reflect popular belief. That is, a look at all the details about ordinary people during the Middle Ages that are typically overlooked in written sources.

Moreover, one might also expect written sources that add to the overall historical picture, such as licenses for ale houses, court records, wills, correspondence, and other documentation that offers glimpses of women's relation...

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