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Current Issue
Volume 135,
Issue 535
Winter 2022

About the Journal

The Journal of American Folklore, the quarterly journal of the American Folklore Society since the Society's founding in 1888, publishes scholarly articles, notes, and commentaries directed to a wide professional audience. Other sections include those devoted to poetry, short fiction, and creative non-fiction on matters fundamental to the field; and reviews of books, exhibitions and events, films, sound recordings, and digital/online resources. The contents of the Journal reflect a wide range of topics and points of view. As the flagship publication of the Society, the Journal reflects concerns of members in both academic and public spheres. Content is grounded in past and current folklore scholarship, and is based on recognized disciplinary methods. Articles present significant research findings and theoretical analyses from the disciplinary perspective of folklore. Notes are narrower in scope and focus on a single, often provocative, issue of definition, interpretation, or practice. Commentaries briefly address topics raised in earlier articles. Its contents are not restricted to folklore in the United States; the Journal publishes materials on folklore and from folklorists anywhere in the world.

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American Folklore Society

Join the American Folklore Society

The American Folklore Society (AFS) serves the field of folklore studies, comprised of people and institutions that study and communicate knowledge about folklore throughout the world. Members of three groups made common cause by creating the AFS in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1888: scholars in then-developing humanities departments at colleges and universities, museum anthropologists, and private citizens with an interest in the subject. Today, the Society produces publications, meetings, and both print and web resources to support our members’ work to study, understand, and communicate about folklore, and to help them build professional and social networks inside and outside our field. Our 2,000 members and subscribers are scholars, teachers, and libraries at colleges and universities; public humanists working in arts and cultural organizations; and community members involved in folklore work. Many of our members live and work in the US, but their interests in folklore stretch around the world, and today about one in every eight AFS members is from outside the US.

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