Sherene Razack's latest work is an essential contribution to contemporary scholarship concerning the “war on terror.” There is a formidable amount of research dedicated to Islamophobia's function in relation to imperialism and empire-building. And yet, Razack's analysis manages to capture powerfully the contemporary configurations of anti-Muslim racism within a domestic and transnational context. As Razack explains, anti-Muslim racism—which she consciously uses in place of the more popular term “Islamophobia,” given that Islamophobia “is a term that often leaves white supremacy outside the frame of analysis” (p. 15)—is not merely exclusive; it is also productive, allowing for the consolidation and fortification of (white supremacist) collective identities that find common purpose and emotional enrichment in the violent expulsion of the haunting figure of the Muslim.

Razack argues that race is central to understanding anti-Muslim sentiment and violence, in large part because anti-Muslim discourses and systematic structures of exclusion are preserved through...

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