“Debt” is at once “a form of imperialism” and “a form of freedom, emancipation, or liberation” (p. 19), writes Jodi Kim in Settler Garrison. Professor of Media & Cultural Studies at the University of California, Riverside, Kim examines this paradox to uncover how the United States frees itself from its own indebtedness while mobilizing the debt it imposes upon places in Asia and the Pacific. Settler Garrison attends to four purposes in so doing. First, Kim charts the postWorld War II emergence and function of “US militarist settler imperialism,” or the manifestation of how “US settler colonialism” combines with “military empire.” Second, she examines how the United States creates “settler garrison[s]” to elevate its own jurisdictional and sovereign authority. Third, she connects these processes to an “exceptional temporal logic” of debt. Debt, in Kim's estimation, is an “economic relation” and a “cultural relation and form undergirded by...

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