In their critique of Kathryn Bigelow's 2017 film adaptation of the Algiers Motel incident during the 1967 Great Rebellion, historians Mark Jay and Virginia Leavell argue that by constructing tales of “irrational violence pitting young, angry, and unruly Black men against a group of racist rogue police officers,” popular representations of racial uprisings often fail to ask: “What were the causes of such dramatically articulated outrage? What did people demand, and of whom? Was this a political rebellion with targets and demands or merely an ineffectual symptom of the mass exploitation, unemployment, and racism endemic to advanced capitalism?”1 Retelling Detroit's under-studied 1943 racial uprising, Rachel Marie-Crane Williams's graphic history Run Home If You Don't Want to Be Killed offers a brilliant example of how to contextualize the causes and experiences of Detroit's interrelated histories of racial terror, labor organizing, and Civil Rights activism rather than narratively capitalize on its...

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