After the Voting Rights Act passed in 1965 and its protections were broadened ten years later to include “language minorities,” the law made the ballot more accessible to Black and Brown voters. Oliver Richomme explains that they would not merely participate in elections but became integrally involved in California's redistricting process, further complicating an already convoluted practice. Additional factors in the second half of the twentieth century made the drawing of lines on a map increasingly contentious.

In Race and Partisanship in California Redistricting, Richomme argues that race and partisanship are closely linked to redistricting and that the political forces and events within a decade influence the subsequent decades’ redistricting process. To study the connection between race and partisanship and how redistricting changes over time, Richomme studies fifty years of California's history of redistricting. He claims that as the state's racial diversity continues to grow along with their demand...

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