Italians and Greeks immigrated to a racially polarized America, and while the U.S. government had stamped them “white” (Thomas A. Guglielmo's White on Arrival, 15), some Americans had difficulty in assigning them to one of the two races, white or not white. Race ambiguity was one of the challenges both groups faced when developing their identity as ethnic Americans. Y. Anagnostou, Y. Kalogeras, and T. Patrona have collected 12 essays from diverse disciplines that eschew the “methodology of singularity” (354) and instead compare and contrast the lived experiences of the millions of Italian and a much smaller but significant number of Greek immigrants and their descendants as they forged an identity first as immigrants, then as ethnics, and finally as hyphenated American citizens from the late nineteenth through the twentieth century.

Italian Americans and Greek Americans influenced their adopted homeland, each other, and other immigrant groups, and they created...

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