Paradise Island and Other Galaxies is a moving, uncanny collection of short stories. The title, unassumingly, points to a simple, even a popular work of speculative fiction, but the stories are vastly more complex, both semantically and stylistically. The first, “Milk Run,” is narrated in the dry, cynical tone of a classic heavy-drinking antihero from the noir genre, who receives a summons from the primum mobile in hard-boiled stories: a sexually alluring woman, “a long-time-no-see fling of mine” (1). In a delightfully dystopian turn, the narrator travels in a spaceship that is an alien travesty of a low-cost flight, where, to the reader's relief, the ever-present screaming toddlers are blissfully eaten up by some of the Hieronymus Bosch-like passengers. The revolutionary robot hijacker, whose dialogue with the narrator is a brilliant parody of politically correct discourse (10), promptly brainwashes everybody except the narrator, converting them to a machine-worship cult, something...

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