What is sound studies, and why remap it? An interdisciplinary research area often found at the margins of established humanities disciplines, sound studies does not lend itself easily to definition. Indeed, a number of influential works in sound studies, such as The Sound Studies Reader (2012) and Keywords in Sound (2015), are dedicated to, at least to some degree, establishing common definitions, theories, and methodologies. Accompanying this movement toward consolidation is a somewhat paradoxical and self-perpetuated public image of sound studies’ disciplinary inclusivity. Kara Keeling and Josh Kun write, for example, that “sound studies has grown into a field hospitable to anyone interested in exploring sound's social meanings, cultural histories, technological evolutions, political impacts, and spatial mappings” (2011:451). In Remapping Sound Studies, however, coeditors Gavin Steingo and Jim Sykes argue that sound studies’ inclusive ideal frequently belies a Western European normativism and ideological...

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