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Notes

1. Starting with Claude Levi-Strauss’s and Mary Douglas’s highly differing explorations of Jewish food taboos, and moving to more recent works such as Chirita Banerji, Feeding the Gods: Memories of Food and Culture in Bengal (New York: Seagull, 2006); Daniel Sack, White Bread Protestants: Food and Religion in American Culture (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000); and Norman Wirzba, Food and Faith: A Theology of Eating (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011).
2. A few useful examples for interested readers could include Food and Identity: Gender and Power, edited by Carole Counih and Steven Kaplan (Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Press, 2008); Marion Bishop, “Speaking Sisters: Relief Society Cookbooks and Mormon Culture,” in Recipes for Reading: Community Cookbooks, Stories, Histories, edited by Anne L. Bower (Boston, Mass.: University of Massachusetts Press, 1997); Sarah Barringer Gordon, “The Liberty of Self-Degradation: Polygamy, Woman Suffrage, and Consent in Nineteenth-Century America,” The Journal of American History (December 1996): 815–47.

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