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Notes

1. Julina Lambson Smith, quoted in Kenneth W. Godfrey, Audrey M. Godfrey, and Jill Mulvay Derr, eds., Women’s Voices: An Untold History of the Latter-day Saints, 1830-1900 (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1982), 346.
2. “Obituaries: Frances Ann Adams,” Woman’s Exponent 31 (March 1903): 78.
3. Tony Begonja, Eucharistic Bread-Baking as Ministry (San Jose, Calif.: Resource Publications, 1991); H. E.Jacob, Six Thousand Years of Bread: Its Holy and Unholy History, translated by Richard and Clara Winston (New York: Skyhorse Publishing, 2007).
4. Nancy Naomi Alexander Tracy, 1816-1902, “Life History of Nancy Naomi Alexander Tracy Written by Herself,” typescript, L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, http://www.boap.org/LDS/Early-Saints/NTracy.html (accessed May 14, 2011).
5. Salt Lake School of the Prophets Minutes, October 3, 1883, in Merle H. Graffam, ed., Salt Lake School of the Prophets Minutes, 1883 (Palm Deseret, Calif.: ULC Press, 1981), 38.
6. Lesley Northup, Ritualizing Women: Patterns of Spirituality (Cleveland, Ohio: Pilgrim Press, 1997), 85. Lesley Northup has written extensively on the topic of ritualizing women and the horizontality of these rituals. Her scholarship has deeply influenced my thinking on this topic. See also her “Expanding the X-Axis: Women, Religious Ritual, and Culture,” in her anthology, Women and Religious Ritual (Washington, D.C.: Pastoral Press, 1993), and her “Claiming Horizontal Space: Women’s Religious Rituals,” Studia Liturgica 25, no. 1 (Spring 1995): 86-102.
7. Lesley A. Northup, “Emerging Patterns of Women’s Ritualizing in the West,” Journal of Ritual Studies 9, no. 2 (Summer 1995): 109.
8. Laurel Robertson, Carol Flinders, and Bronwen Godfrey, The Laurel’s Kitchen Bread Book: A Guide to Whole-Grain Breadmaking (New York: Random House, 1984).
9. Mircea Eliade, The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion (Orlando, Fla.: Harcourt, 1987). For a critique of Eliade, see Jonathan Z. Smith, To Take Place: Toward Theory in Ritual (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992), and his “No Need to Travel to the Indies: Judaism and the Study of Religion” in Jacob Neusner, ed., Take Judaism, for Example (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983); Eric J. Sharpe, Comparative Religion: A History, 2d ed. (La Salle, Ill.: Open Court, 1986). For a discussion of the usefulness of Eliade in Mormon studies, see Richard L. Bushman, “’Eliade’s Return,’” The Mormon Review 1, no. 3 (2009): 1-4, http://timesandseasons.org/mormonreview/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/MormonReviewV1N3.pdf as well as “MR: ’Eliade’s Return,’” http://timesandseasons.org/index.php/2009/09/mr-eliades-return/ (accessed May 14, 2011).
10. Ron Grimes, Reading, Writing and Ritualizing: Ritual in Fictive, Liturgical and Public Places (Washington, D.C.: Pastoral Press, 1993), 5.
11. Ann Braude, ed., “Blu Greenberg,” in Transforming the Faiths of Our Fathers: Women Who Changed American Religion (New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2004), 243.

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