Bruce P. Stark's The Myth and Reality of Slavery in Eastern Connecticut is largely concerned with debunking the theory that the eastern Connecticut lands held by the wealthy Browne family for much of the eighteenth century constituted a “so-called ‘slave plantation.’” This theory was popularized, according to Stark, by a series of newspaper articles published in the early 2000s, most notably Maria Hileman's “Rewriting Slavery's History,” published in New London's The Day in 2001, and the Hartford Courant's special publication entitled Complicity: How Connecticut Chained Itself to Slavery, published in 2002. In the two decades since, Stark argues, Connecticut-area archaeologists, including but not limited to scholars such as Janet Woodruff, Gerald F. Sawyer, and Warren R. Perry, have expanded upon that argument in order to perpetuate the notion that the Browne family did indeed own and operate a slave plantation in Salem, Connecticut (then known as New Salem Parish),...

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