Oral histories are invaluable resources for the study of history. In the 1930s, as part of Roosevelt's New Deal, the Works Progress Administration began conducting oral history interviews with former enslaved people, which became the infamous WPA Slave Narratives, giving firsthand accounts of their experiences.1 Taking place before the age of recording devices, these histories live on in written word only. As technology progressed, so too did the ability to record actual voices to accompany the transcriptions. Eventually, oral histories were taken via video. Not only did this allow viewers the chance to hear the participant's voice, it also captured body language and facial expressions, which added a depth to the interviews previously unattainable. A notable use of this method comes from The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Jeff and Toby Herr Oral History Archive, which includes oral histories of “Jews, Roma, Jehovah's Witnesses, homosexuals, political prisoners, and others...

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