Though it did not involve the armed forces of the United States, the Spanish Civil War, fought from 1936 to 1939, occasioned much discussion in the American press and civil society. Propaganda, dueling editorials, fundraising, and activism cropped up shortly after the foreign conflict started in cities such as New York, Boston, Cincinnati, and San Francisco.1 To this list can be added a spate of letters in the pages of the Hartford Courant in 1938, after Congressman Herman P. Kopplemann seemed to take sides in the conflict by signing a letter to the Loyalists. A survey of the two dozen letters that the newspaper printed shows invocation of anti-Communism and accounts of alleged Loyalist atrocities and repression against Catholics by critics of Kopplemann; and pro-democracy and anti-fascist sentiment from his defenders. Kopplemann, noteworthy as New England's only Jewish congressman and the region's only member of the House to sign...

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