There are many reasons why attention to place in higher education is good for our students, good for the discipline of history, good for the humanities and the liberal arts, and good for Connecticut. In an era when we seem to be losing in each of these categories, we educators can make some simple shifts in our teaching praxis to stem the narrative of decline that seems so pervasive and daunting.

The narrative of decline, unfortunately, is not made up. Disparities in education are real, and they are drawn along racial lines. We live in segregated towns, where white children continue to have more advantages than children of color.1 In Connecticut, our capital city is consistently ranked among the poorest cities in the nation, while its surrounding region ranks among the wealthiest.2 Where Americans once valued education as a public good, a vital means of educating its citizenry...

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