Elizabeth Clendinning's American Gamelan and the Ethnomusicological Imagination contributes new perspectives to a growing body of literature focused on the myriad ways gamelans have become entangled with North American ways of life. Its focus on the transnational dimensions of founding and maintaining a gamelan at an academic institution, specifically those that must be navigated to create artistic and cultural exchange that is equitable and sustainable, highlights the broader role that these institutions have played in shaping relations between Indonesian and American musicians. Despite what the title suggests, the book should not be mistaken for a comprehensive interrogation of the complex and diverse relationships that exist among Indonesian musicians, gamelan instruments (Javanese and Balinese), and American universities. It does not discuss the sounds that emanate from these connections, which have been the subject of considerable scholarly intrigue, owing in part to longstanding connections between North American and Indonesian compositional activity. Nor...

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