There is a saying in Haitian Kreyòl that one must “voye wòch, kache men,” or “throw the rock [but] hide the hand.” Naturally, the art of throwing and catching hidden meanings through metaphors in Haitian song involves both the skillful toss of the artists (i.e., “sounding”) and the conscious grasping by the audience (i.e., “listening”). From foreign occupation to military regimes to life in a foreign land, and even to just surviving the everyday, the vast use of creative word play in song is a significant source of power and justice for the Haitian people. At the same time, Haitian politicians and commercial artists have coopted these tactics to achieve their own agendas. Nowhere is sounding and listening as a politically and socially engaged act more contentious than during the carnival season, exactly where Rebecca Dirksen sets the stage for her deep dive into musical engagement in Haiti....

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