The editorial practices of two Black editors—Frederick Douglass and Pauline Hopkins—revolutionize our understanding of the circulation history of Sarah Piatt's “most anthologized poem”: “The Black Princess.”1 Douglass gave “The Black Princess” its earliest known reprinting on January 2, 1873, in the New National Era, exactly one week after its December 26, 1872, debut in the Independent.2 Twenty-five years later, Hopkins (mis)quoted “The Black Princess” twice in her first novels, Contending Forces and Of One Blood.3 In each novel Hopkins uses lines from the poem to describe the physical appearance of an elderly Black woman character. As will be discussed, both of these characters depart from the image of the formerly enslaved woman in Piatt's poem, as Hopkins portrays her characters leading culturally-rich lives in the postbellum era. Two of the most prominent African American editors of their respective eras, Douglass and Hopkins exerted unimaginable...

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