Abstract

Five recurring errors in history of psychology textbooks are discussed. One involves an identical misquotation. The remaining examples involve factual and interpretational errors that more than one and usually several textbook authors made. In at least 2 cases some facts were fabricated, namely, so-called facts associated with Pavlov’s mugging and Descartes’s reasons for choosing the pineal gland as the locus for mind-body interaction. A fourth example involves Broca’s so-called discovery of the speech center, and the fifth example involves misinterpretations of Lloyd Morgan’s intentions regarding his famous canon. When an error involves misinterpretation and thus misrepresentation, I will show why the misinterpretation is untenable.

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