The last few decades have marked a significant watershed in the study of world Christianity as an emerging field, its development into an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary endeavor in particular. Most scholarship—thanks in no small part to the impact of Klaus Koschorke and the historiography of the “Munich School”—now characterizes world Christianity as a “polycentric” faith whose adherents have become more demographically robust in the majority world than in Europe and North America. Additionally, while the primary focus in world Christianity continues to be Christianity’s burgeoning presence in the Global South (Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America, and the Pacific), scholars are increasingly aware of the diffusion of Global South Christianities in a variety of South-South and South-North diasporas. Reflection on the complex history and reality of Christianity not only as a world religion but also as a pluricultural, global phenomenon is an ongoing need. While research on Christianity’s cross-cultural,...

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