William Gibson is Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Director of the Oxford Centre for Methodism and Church History at Oxford Brookes University and a prolific scholar of late seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English religious history. This study of Samuel Wesley, father of John and Charles, sets him in the context of the tumultuous forty years of what Gibson describes as ‘the long Glorious Revolution’. These years saw the Roman Catholic James II's removal, a first step away from an English Anglican confessional state by granting toleration to Dissenters, a failed attempt to ‘comprehend’ moderate Dissenters in the Church of England, initiatives to improve that Church's pastoral effectiveness and the nation's godliness, and the succession of a German Lutheran king, all against the background of war against France and political unrest at home. They were challenging times for High Church Anglicans like Samuel Wesley senior.

Treating Samuel Wesley as a significant figure...

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