Much ink has been spilled on the subject of the Decadents and Bloomsbury, both in academia and in popular culture. In Queer Kinship after Wilde: Transnational Decadence and the Family, Kristin Mahoney uses published works as well as personal archival material to “disinter” another artistic circle, one made of “queer and Decadent modernists who operated alongside and often in conversation with high modernism, but who thought, wrote, and made community in a slightly different fashion” (11). Mahoney’s unnamed circle is looser than those two well-established ones but traces a clear web of shared concerns among the early twentieth-century British and American artists it encompasses. In six chapters, each one devoted to an individual or couple, Mahoney explores the distinct ways in which her subjects drew on Decadence and cosmopolitanism as they theorized new forms of kinship. Her work participates in a larger movement, taken up by scholars like Jessica...

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