The book under review examines how a number of key literary and cultural texts, spanning the nineteenth to the early twentieth centuries, from Britain and India (mainly Bengal), imagined the world after decolonization. The book, by an academic working in English and South Asian literary studies, uses literary and cultural geographical approaches, grounded in cultural and historical materialism. It also makes a fresh contribution to utopian studies, especially in the methods we use in this field. The book focuses on what the first chapter evocatively terms, in its title, spatial desire in the age of empire. Taking inspiration from the work of scholars such as Edward Said and Raymond Williams who analyzed cultural geographies from materialist lenses, while being critical of colonialism, imperialism, and predatory capitalism, Banerjee’s book analyzes mainly poetry and fiction. At the heart of the book are also Ernest Bloch’s notions of utopian hope and anticipatory consciousness,...

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