Readers of Geczy's book are in for a wild ride. The lavishly illustrated narrative moves in broad strokes from the commedia dell'arte to cyborgs, with gross-out plastic surgery disasters and live sex dolls in between. The book's premise is simple: where humans once found their humanity in separating themselves from the artificial, in our current technologically infused age, humans want more than anything to become as artificial as possible. Geczy puts it simply: “In the humanist age, Pinocchio wanted to become human; in the so-called post-humanist age, humans aspire to become Pinocchio” (2). His examples are anything but simple, however. Arguing that in and around the 1980s, the move from “dolls imitating humans, to humans wanting to be dolls” (10) became more pronounced, Geczy takes the reader on a grand tour of human use of puppets, dolls, and artificial selves from the Renaissance to the right now, showing how “we...

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