Jennifer Wagner-Lawlor's Postmodern Utopias and Feminist Fictions represents not only a significant contribution in utopian studies; it is also a major intervention in contemporary literary studies and global cultural studies more generally. Each of the book's chapters is structured around a specific set of formal and generic questions, exploring in great detail and with a tremendous amount of insight recent feminist revisionings of older genres, including the bildungsroman, the novel of art, nonlinear histories, American historical novels, and finally, in an extraordinary turn, the works of contemporary Arab feminist writers, which, Wagner-Lawlor shows, “directly address the nature of the work left to do, as individuals and as communities in search of a better world” (154). Through her study, Wagner-Lawlor demonstrates, in a way that echoes the project of Fredric Jameson in his landmark 2005 book, Archaeologies of the Future: The Desire Called Utopia and Other Science Fictions, that...

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