Food studies as an academic discipline has expanded tremendously in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Study of the intersection of food and religion is not new, but as a field of inquiry it is ripe for new work. This new compendium edited by Zeller, Dallam, Neilson, and Rubel does double duty in that regard: It provides several important chapter-length contributions to existing scholarship, and it points to the way to new possibilities for scholarship. Indeed, no reasonably imaginative scholar could read this volume and fail to come away with several solid ideas for further study.

A standard critique of edited volumes is that they are uneven and often short on overall coherence. That criticism could be applied here, but my response to it would be that the diversity of the chapters, in both subject matter and approach, opens up plenty of new vistas and therefore is more a...

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