Looking at past reviews of books of literary criticism and food, I was struck by Choice's comments on a text published a mere fifteen years ago: “Even a quick review of contemporary volumes on food and literary criticism reveals a sort of sheepish, amused treatment of the subject, as if it were too light a topic to explore in a really serious book.”1 From this perspective, the relevance of food in literary studies as well as most other fields is worth noting. This special issue on the intersection between utopian studies and food studies certainly provides a case in point. But as it is a relatively new field, there remain broad avenues open for exploration. Alison Carruth's Global Appetites: American Power and the Literature of Food takes up just such an exploration.

Global Appetites analyzes the geopolitics of food in American literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries,...

You do not currently have access to this content.