Modernity, morality, science, and the twentieth century are topics well studied by utopian scholars. The protracted birth of the modern era, with its newly available scientific and technological ideas and tools, involved countless large and small, and well- and not-so-well-conceived, ideas, plans, and projects that could improve or destroy society. The process took centuries. Although the author of Modern Food, Moral Food does not frame it as a utopian study, it should interest scholars of utopianism because it primarily covers two utopia-tinged endeavors in the early twentieth century: Progressivism and the World War I voluntary rationing campaign of the U.S. Food Administration led by Herbert Hoover. Both efforts pulsed with utopian goals to transform the United States and, indeed, the world into a better, more equable place. The overall thesis is that the Progressives revolutionized American food and American society by rationalizing American food habits with their science and infusing...

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