Zora Neale Hurston's Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” is an oral history of one of the last Africans transported to the United States before the Civil War. The manuscript was originally composed between 1927 and 1928 but has until now sat in the archives of Howard University due to Hurston's refusal to publish it without the dialect markers that feature prominently throughout the text. The narrative follows Cujo “Kossola” Lewis from his village in Africa, where he lived for nineteen years, to America where he lived in slavery and then freedom. Hurston's role in this storytelling is obvious: her literary voice and embellishments dominate the text as style elements impossible to ignore. That Hurston adds herself as a character who acts as a narrator-guide in this telling seems at odds with Cujo's voice and experience but ultimately is not. She does well to acknowledge and temper her...

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