Though its title does not announce this book as an anthology of utopian scholarship as such, its editor's profile in the field is well established. An accomplished scholar of the thought and reception of the work of H. G. Wells, Partington reveals at the outset that the idea for the volume emerged from a presentation given to the 2005 Utopian Studies Society conference in New Lanark. Motivated by the capacious interdisciplinarity of the conference, Partington sought to advance the musical dimension within utopian studies by calling for contributions to a collection of essays on Woody Guthrie's work in the context of American and international politics, one that would draw upon expertise in “cultural studies, history, literature, journalism and folklore.” Though the book is not explicitly utopian in its title, or often its content, utopianism nonetheless “seems to emerge from its pages” (xi). Guthrie's was a time of war, of great...

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