It seemed appropriate to arrange this year’s summaries of recent Thornton Wilder scholarship by beginning with articles or books that most directly concern Thornton Wilder’s writing and ending with those that have more of a peripheral interest in or mention of Wilder and his works. The items highlighted here are certainly no exception to the pattern that we continue to see: the cosmopolitan and genre-crossing nature of Thornton Wilder’s writing.

In the second part of their essay, Rojcewicz and Hallett follow up their earlier article (“Wilder in Italy Part I”) by taking a detailed look at several of Wilder’s novels that are significantly influenced by his time in Rome. Rather than focusing on specific personal experiences that Wilder had in Italy as they did in Part I, here they provide close readings of Wilder’s texts to highlight the important influence of his time in Italy, including his friendship with Lauro...

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