According to the authors, this book “examine[s] a wide range of evidence pointing to factors that have an effect on readability” (ix). It is aimed to serve as a “guidance to writers and educators” (ix) and as a “one-stop resource for both scholars and practitioners” (1). It also aims to be an “attempt to begin to establish a direction for a unified study of readability” (ix). I will argue in this review that it does provide an overview of existing readability studies, but that its criticism somewhat narrowly focusses on readability formulas while ignoring existing non-formulaic proposals and lacking the theoretical depth and crosslinguistic rigor to really provide an interdisciplinary approach to the notion of readability.

In writing this book, which is based on an article by the authors, Bailin and Grafstein have “hoped and assumed that the reader of this book will come from a diverse range of disciplines”...

You do not currently have access to this content.