Increasingly, Steinbeck Review is receiving articles that touch on the topic of Steinbeck and deep ecology. To illustrate, the lead article in this issue, Juliana Restivo's “Steinbeck's Pregnant Bodies: Childbirth, Land, and Production,” and the intercalary piece, Robert Searway's “Conflicting Views of Landscape in John Steinbeck's Literary West,” both hint at this topic. In A Sand County Almanac, and Sketches Here and There, early environmentalist Aldo Leopold captures the heart of the philosophy underlying today's deep ecology movement: “In short, a land ethic changes the role of Homo sapiens from conqueror of the land-community to plain member and citizen of it” (204). Brian Railsback's study of parallels between Charles Darwin's scientific expeditions and John Steinbeck's aesthetic provides a similar perspective on the interrelationship between humans and what Leopold calls “the land-community”: “Steinbeck's extensive use of personification and anthropomorphism underscores his view of Homo sapiens as just another species” (132)....

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