As this review is appearing in SHAW, I might begin by noting a tendency of some recent scholarly publications to erase from historical accounts that towering figure among his contemporaries, Bernard Shaw. Perhaps GBS’s sheer pervasiveness in his own time has provoked an equal but opposite reaction in ours, one of silence and invisibility, of shadowy absence, of what, in contemporary parlance, is called ghosting. One example might be Palgrave Macmillan’s 2014 anthology Ireland and the New Journalism, which, with some justification, foregrounded the controversial (New Journalism was nothing if not controversial) English editor W.T. Stead, but gave comparatively little space to the most notable London-based Irish editor of New Journalism, editor T. P. O’Connor, and practically none to the also Irish London-based Shaw, perhaps New Journalism’s most notable journalist and critic.

Much the same myopia, if that is the word (schotoma or agnosia may be more accurate)...

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