I was surprised when Christopher Wixson, editor of SHAW, invited me, a non-Spanish speaker, to review Gustavo A. Rodríguez Martin’s book, which, as the title explains, elucidates Shaw’s place in Hispanic culture and society. Wixson quickly assured me that most readers of SHAW likely do not speak or read Spanish and that my perspective would thus be appropriate. I then readily accepted the honor of reviewing Rodríguez Martin’s fine collection of sixteen essays by leading authorities on Spanish literature and culture. The editor of this volume acknowledges that, in many ways, this collection answers the earlier Bernard Shaw and the French by Michel Pharand, who set a fine example for studies of Bernard Shaw in other languages and cultures.

The introduction by Rodríguez Martin presents a broad overview of Shaw’s influence in the Spanish-speaking world, noting that appraisals of Shaw as a thinker and playwright began to appear as...

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